Cultivating Food Justice: Race, Class and Sustainability

Cultivating Food Justice: Race, Class and Sustainability (MIT Press 2011). Click this link to buy it  –> Purchase book

0 thoughts on “Cultivating Food Justice: Race, Class and Sustainability

  1. I think a some white people think it’s their job to teach (or ‘save’) non white people about or from something they feel is wrong and foreign to them. They don’t take into consideration their lifestyles, environment, their struggles, etc. They just want to ‘help’ out some people that are a darker hue and at the end of the day, pat themselves on the back for all of her effort trying to make them into ‘better’ people. ‘The White Man’s Burden’ basically.

    The book sounds interesting, I think I will order it too for christmas.

    1. Facts and truths exist and are not culturally relative. Surely they are worth teaching or saying, independent of lifestyles, environment, struggles etc.

      1. Why is it that whenever I post anything related to my critical race research, Peter, you seem to always want to dismiss it? Am I hallucinating?

        I have been patient and polite for awhile now, but I think I will ask that you don’t post here anymore if you always feel you must dismiss the critical race research and personal experiences here. This is supposed to be a safe and empowering space for people to talk about how race and whiteness influence all aspects of life. It is difficult to do this if one keeps on posting that they don’t want to address it. If you don’t agree with the work I do, then you may want to start your own blog or go to the many pro-vegan blogs that only consider the suffering of non human animals as priority. There are plenty out there and I am sure you will find people who support your framework.

        Best
        Breeze

      2. Peter, cut the crap.You know what you are doing. You are not here to discuss her ideas. that comment about appreciation society was some passive-aggressive nonsense.

        Seriously, without Breeze’s responding to you, you have nothing. You feel the need to respond because what she says threatens your sense of reality. It shakes you up, but you just can’t pull your head out your a$$ long enough to see it.

        And by the way Peter, your statement about Muslims and Islam, on the other post, was f*cked up. For you to dismiss the suffering that Muslims in the USA have endured, since 9/11, because of Islamaphobia (and yes, I WILL use that word), which is due to a “white supremacist Christian framing of what a ‘terrorist’ supposedly looks like by the way, is really disturbing to me. I mean, are you seriously trying to be part of this conversation about race or whiteness, or are you just here to ‘colonize’ everyone into thinking only YOUR way about the role of humans and non-human animals and how veganism SHOULD be practiced? If you really wanted to understand this, you would have read, taken courses, workshops, etc., a long time ago about how YOUR OWN WHITENESS has informed how you see the world. But you know what? As a white male with racial and gender privilege, YOU DON’T HAVE TO because that is how structural racism and normative whiteness and patriarchy WORK; that is how it has structured you consciousness and you either don’t even realize it or just don’t give a sh*t and are here on this blog to simply be a damn bully. Breeze has been incredibly gracious towards you and other people who come on here to simply bully her. She has been polite and I can see how she has really tried not to ‘hurt feelings.’ Seems like she has the capacity to not want to cause even her bullies to ‘suffer’ and has taken a lot of time and effort to try to respond in a way to give y’all fools the benefit of the doubt… It speaks a lot about her character that after having this blog for 4 years and being bullied, she continues to be careful with everyone’s feelings. And this is why she is more effective in getting people who otherwise wouldn’t consider doing so, to take a critical look at how they treat both human beings AND non-human animals.
        8:10 PM
        thanks

  2. Hi Breeze, I’m not dismissing it. Actually I find your work really interesting and want to discuss it. Your ideas are so different to mine. If my comments are unwelcome I’ll stop posting but this isn’t an appreciation society is it?

  3. There is a huge difference between discussion and dismissing, Peter, you are dismissing s lot of what she says and not inciting discussion. If you want to discuss it, discuss it. Breeze is not your personal tutor. I, as a reader and someone who really values what Breeze is saying and would love to follow an actual discussion on these topics, would prefer that you didn’t comment. It is hampering real discussion.

  4. I am a white female from Canada. I consider myself to be very open minded. I welcome all ideas and new thoughts, considering the fact that more and more people need to discuss our present predicament.
    My thoughts on the issue: the color of my skin does not determine the content of my character. It never has and it never will. BUT, we have, either consciously or unconsciously, identified my gender, my skin with a “type of person”. And “GODDMAN MISSISSIPPI”, we do that with ALL races. And that identification process is transposed to the person being identified accordingly. Do we not establish our sense of self from the early stages of our existence, precisely when we are young and vulnerable. And do we not learn to identify others from an early stage as well, when we are young and naive ? Peter, brother, it’s about people being sick and tired of being categorized. I am not a category.

Add a Mindful Comment (No Trolling Please)