The Sistah Vegan Project

On the Myth of Being a Strong Black Woman, Decolonizing Our Taste Buds, and Self-Care

Claudia Serrato (Left) and Dr. A. Breeze Harper (Right) at CAER, May 18 2013 discussing Women of Color, Food Justice, and Self-Care

Claudia Serrato (Left) and Dr. A. Breeze Harper (Right) at CAER, May 18 2013 discussing Women of Color, Food Justice, and Self-Care

This photo (and video of the lecture below) is from the women of color food justice and self-care panel. This took place at the Conference Against Environmental Racism at the University of Oregon-Eugene, on May 18 2013. The featured critical thinkers are Dr. A. Breeze Harper of the Sistah Vegan Project (on the right) and on the left is Decolonial Food For Thought blogger and PhD Student Claudia Serrato.  Claudia’s work is amazing. She is developing indigenous decolonial veganism as well as focusing on something called ‘womb ecology’, which you’ll hear more about during this talk. Also, at the beginning of the panel, Claudia explained that she brings her daughter with her everywhere and asks that everyone be open to sharing this space with her toddler. I find this really profound, as it is rare that women can do this and/or are allowed to do this in the USA. I also shared with the audience that I nurse on demand when my kids were really really young, so I would bring them to many of my conferences; I would even nurse on stage because that is a form of food justice that simply isn’t taken seriously. So, mad props to Claudia. 

Below is the video of our recorded panel talk. Get ready to hear about the psychic and nutritional consequences of subscribing to the “Strong Black Woman” syndrome, decolonizing our taste buds, and indigenous decolonial veganism that is not rooted in Eurocentric animal rights canon. I debut my new singing mantra about 7 minutes into the video. It is called “Strong Black Woman”.

If you enjoy these types of dialogues and want to keep on supporting the Sistah Vegan Project, feel free to donate what you can by clicking below on gofundme. You can find out all about our goal to turn the Sistah Vegan Project into an official 501 c 3 non-profit organization!

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9 thoughts on “On the Myth of Being a Strong Black Woman, Decolonizing Our Taste Buds, and Self-Care

  1. YaDi on said:

    Great talk.

    It’s true. “Gordita/o” in latin america is a total term of endearment. My mom calls me that to this day. Don’t get me wrong. Latin America is profoundly troubled/obsessed when it comes to women’s images/physical appearances but “gordita” is a real old-time phrase that has not been corrupted by contemporary media/image issues.

    Hispanic populations in the US, as Claudia points, react poorly to the term. I tend not to call my nieces that because they might be negatively affected/ internalize the term in a self-loathing way.

  2. YaDi on said:

    BTW-thank you sharing your space with and generously devoting attention to a fellow female activist in decolonial veganism.

    Despite the “collaboration” discourses one hears so often (as in the academy, ahem, but other industries as well) the territorial nastiness over expertise/attention and the self-importance of so many scholars keeps would-be partners and peers out of the limelight. There is, of course, the group version of that, the academic “clique” –high school all over again.

    Again, kudos for sharing and supporting the/your/ our sisterhood.

  3. “Claudia explained that she brings her daughter with her everywhere and asks that everyone be open to sharing this space with her toddler. ” That is so, so awesome!

  4. Breeze, your song, your singing voice and your speaking voice are beautiful!

  5. Iana on said:

    Well phooey this was right in my state so I’m sad to have missed this talk. I was really moved by the mantra and have shared similar struggles with constantly putting on that iron mask of tolerance even though many of my experiences were perfectly intolerable.

    Thanks for sharing!

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  8. Jenny on said:

    “Also, at the beginning of the panel, Claudia explained that she brings her daughter with her everywhere and asks that everyone be open to sharing this space with her toddler. I find this really profound, as it is rare that women can do this and/or are allowed to do this in the USA. I also shared with the audience that I nurse on demand when my kids were really really young, so I would bring them to many of my conferences; I would even nurse on stage because that is a form of food justice that simply isn’t taken seriously. So, mad props to Claudia. ”
    Maybe you’ll like http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/maggie-aderinpocock-a-woman-on-a-mission-proving-science-isnt-just-for-rich-white-men-7584939.html too?
    “Maggie Aderin-Pocock breezes into the newly refurbished Royal Institution in London, where Michael Faraday and a long line of eminent scientists have communicated science to the public, and mentions that at some point in the interview she may have to breastfeed her baby daughter, Lauren…”

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