The Sistah Vegan Project

On Revisiting Being Called “Racist Cunt”, [Mis]Interpreting Zen Buddhism, and Excusing Abuse

I continue to be mindful to a plethora of people in which mindfulness (at least how I perceive it to be) is not reciprocated. At this point, I’m trying to understand why I don’t have it in me to be ‘nasty’ and try to hurt their feelings like they have hurt mine.

Why do I actually care about the feelings of people who call me ‘racist cunt’ for doing critical race studies, or for other disgusting language used whenever I politely blog on the Sistah Vegan project?

In addition, outside of my blog space, why do I continue to believe that if someone is impolite, cruel, nasty, etc., I shouldn’t hate them or assume that their ‘bad’ behavior means they have a ‘bad’ spirit/soul?¬†Why do I still believe and tell myself, “They aren’t really like that. Underneath all of the anger, hate, vitriol, etc., there is the capacity for mindfulness and unconditional love”?” As of this evening, I really question how I’ve been dealing with this phenomenon and wonder if I’m just too “stupid” or “naive” to realize I am accepting “abuse” and being an apologist for their behavior and rationalizing it through the logic of my Zen Buddhist practice.

Maybe I’ve completely misinterpreted the precepts of Zen Buddhism (?)

Short post, but it’s been on my mind this evening.

 

 

 

 

 

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7 thoughts on “On Revisiting Being Called “Racist Cunt”, [Mis]Interpreting Zen Buddhism, and Excusing Abuse

  1. Decius on said:

    Is it because you are not committing fundamental attribution error</a??

  2. This is a point that I have stressed in yoga teacher training. Mindfulness is a wonderful thing, but it should not be confused with apologizing for someone’s abuse.

  3. I’m not Buddhist, so do not have the vocabulary as above. I think you are a decent person who has not been wounded in ways that you feel the only defense is offense. Or, you have been wounded but have the depth of character–perhaps an old soul–to have achieved the state of “there but for grace go I”–e.g. forgiveness– grateful for all favors.

  4. D'Alta on said:

    Perhaps you know that returning nastiness for nastiness gets you and the first offender nowhere…even if they do not believe as you do, that each of us possesses a spark of goodness somewhere underneath all that anger, hostility, pain. I do not believe that we open ourselves for abuse when we refuse to respond to cutting remarks with our own brand of nasty. We are robbed, give away our own humanity each time we let nastiness spill out of us toward another. We become like the one who seeks to hurt and offend us and are taken off-track from the harder work of being human, of living a fulfilled life, of living with peace, joy, contentment. There are those-and there will always be those!!–who so fear disruption to their world view/world order that they will do anything to prevent change–even living with the destructive, flesh- and soul-destroying cancer of their fear and anger. It takes great courage, strength, and patience to stand by one’s choice and decision to be human. Brava to you for deciding in favor of humanity!!

  5. The Alchemist on said:

    I’m not a buddhist. I don’t think you are under any obligation to subject yourself to someone else’s verbal abuse. You are not just a buddhist but also a black woman. We, black women, experience micro-aggressions as we go about our day. We get enough abuse poured into our laps and over our heads. It must be bothering you or you would not have written a blog post about it. The simpest way to deal with trolls is probably to block them and keep it moving.

    • I have begun to block as of a few days ago. I used to not censor and didn’t believe in censoring, but after receiving a sick response this afternoon, in which the poster talked about committing violence acts towards Black men’s genitals as a response to one of my post, I trashed their comment.

      Yes, this is bothering me, which is why I did post about it :-)

      I’m still going through a never lending learning process of trying to find balance and harmony in the work I do, as a Black woman who is supposed to ‘know her place’ while pretending we all live in a ‘post-racial’ USA. Thanks for dialoging!

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