I’ll Be Giving Birth in 2022….

Forthcoming novel from A. Breeze Harper

My new “baby” in 2022 will be a new novel I’ve been working on since 2019. The book is called Seeds of Sankofa. I use the concept of seeds as metaphor to explore the future of possibilities without forgetting the past.

Seeds of Sankofa is about racial justice, food justice, and Black maternal health justice within the context of the future of ethical foods(i.e. plant-based diets), extractive capitalism, and technocracy in the USA. In Seeds of Sankofa, I’ll be using the genre of Afro-futuristic fantasy/sci-fi to go from head, to heart, to action. As much as I love my high-theory scholarly writing, let’s be honest: It’s rare that wordy dissertations and complicated peer-reviewed theoretical articles inspire in the way movies, theater, and novels have.

Artistic methods move and touch in deeply penetrative and life-changing ways. The way I package and present the message is very crucial. It must be palatable, creative, innovative and entertaining, making it more accessible. Artistic methods can and have done this for centuries.

In Seeds of Sankofa, Black women and girls are the protagonists, gifted with extraordinary abilities. I have fallen in love with all my characters.

Seeds of Sankofa will be my second published novel. My first published novel is called Scars . It is about finding self-love through racial healing and possibility. (Go here to learn more https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23520029-scars)

I’ll be reading excerpts from my new novel soon, on Instagram Live. Details will follow in the next week. I hope you can join me.

#afrofuturism #racialjustice #foodjustice #blackmaternalhealth #ethicalfoods #veganfuture #sankofa

How to Maximize Black History Vs. Just Knowing Our History

Check out my diversity, equity, and inclusion colleague, Doug Harris of Kaleidoscope Group as he breaks down five stages on how to optimize Black History for Black folk: knowing, embracing, personalizing, acting, and achieving.

“If you don’t know where you’ve been, you don’t know where you’re going….” – Doug Harris

“Personal success has minimal meaning when people are failing around you….” -Doug Harris

Also, check out my own post about Black History here: 6 Black History Challenges for White Folk.


Dr A. Breeze Harper

About A. Breeze Harper,PhD

Dr. A. Breeze Harper is a senior diversity and inclusion strategist for Critical Diversity Solutionsa seasoned speaker, and author of books and articles related to critical race feminism, intersectional anti-racism, and ethical consumption. As a writer, she is best know for as the creator and editor of the groundbreaking anthology Sistah Vegan: Black Female Vegans Speak on Food, Identity, Health and Society (Lantern Books 2010). Dr. Harper has been invited to deliver many keynote addresses and lectures at universities and conferences throughout North America. In 2015, her lecture circuit focused on the analysis of food and whiteness in her book Scars and on “Gs Up Hoes Down:” Black Masculinity, Veganism, and Ethical Consumption (The Remix)which explored how key Black vegan men use hip-hop methods to create “race-conscious” and decolonizing approaches to vegan philosophies. In 2016, she collaborated with Oakland’s FoodFirst’s Executive Director Dr. Eric Holt-Gimenez to write the backgrounderDismantling Racism in the Food System, which kicked off FoodFirst’s series on systemic racism within the food system

Dr. Harper is the founder of the Sistah Vegan Project which has put on several ground-breaking conferences with emphasis on intersection of racialized consciousness, anti-racism, and ethical consumption (i.e., veganism, animal rights, Fair Trade). Last year she organized the highly successful conference The Vegan Praxis of Black Lives Matter which can be downloaded.

Dr. Harper’s most recently published book, Scars: A Black Lesbian Experience in Rural White New England (Sense Publishers 2014) interrogates how systems of oppression and power impact the life of the only Black teenager living in an all white and working class rural New England town. Her current 2016 lecture circuit focuses on excerpts from her latest book in progress, Recipes for Racial Tension Headaches: A Critical Race Feminist’s Journey Through ‘Post-Racial’ Ethical Foodscape which will be released in 2017, along with the second Sistah Vegan project anthology The Praxis of Justice in an Era of Black Lives MatterIn tandem with these book projects, she is well-known for her talks and workshops about “Uprooting White Fragility in the Ethical Foodscape” and “Intersectional Anti-Racism Activism.”

USA “Democracy” and Violence

Last night, on January 6, 2021, I was listening to congress talk about how today’s Capitol Hill “riot mob” was an assault on USA’s democracy and that USA was founded on democracy and not violence.

Say what?

USA was founded on violence.

Indigenous genocide. Enslavement of Africans.

This violence created a “democracy” for landowning white men who were basically considered the “humans” in which this democracy was applicable. The land they “owned” was stolen via the genocide and colonization of indigenous peoples.

Enslaved Africans were legally counted as 3/5 human in terms of representation in Congress.

In addition, due to scientific racism, didn’t actually count as fully human and of course could not vote in this democracy. They suffered in this “democracy” and land of liberty. It was several centuries of insufferable hell (and still continues for many).

Indigenous people didn’t count as human either in this democracy. They couldn’t vote. It was several centuries of insufferable hell (and still continues for many).

Only white men could vote and these white men in power made it clear that there would be even more “violence” if anyone but them wanted to be treated equitably in this new democracy. The violence I saw at the Capitol was the predictable outcome of a nation built on this type of “democracy”.

So, I think the USA news outlets need to start talking about this instead of pretending that there is some “new” assault on democracy and that “violence” is not synonymous with the foundation of US Democracy, several centuries ago. Let’s start naming harm that has been caused by this sordid historical foundation of US “democracy”. #democracy#colonization#violence

Dr. A. Breeze Harper is a leading expert on diversity, equity, and inclusion having spent 15 years as a speaker and author focusing on anti-racism. Dr. Harper is a guest expert on an anti-racism podcast collaboration with Radical Candor author Kim Scott, and her most recent book, Scars, looks at how anti-racism and white allyship operate in multi-racial relationships. Breeze has a Ph.D. in the social sciences from U.C. Davis, an M.A. from Harvard, and a B.A. from Dartmouth.

Becoming an antiracist leader….

I’m co-teaching an antiracism and leadership e-course. The 1st one was July 15-Aug 5 and a great success. Due to popular demand we are offering it again, Aug 26-Sep 16. 1 hour a week for 4 weeks! Click on image below to learn more!

The USA is not “a country of immigrants” and this is why…

About the USA, I keep seeing these words:

“We are a country of immigrants.”

Spoken with good intentions, but they gloss over these facts:

There were and still are indigenous people here.

  1. Ninety percent of those First Americans were killed by diseases brought and intentional genocide committed by European colonizers. Simply because they were “in the way,” those few who still survived were driven off their ancestral lands they’d occupied for thousands of years.
  2. West Africans were abducted, enslaved and shipped to this continent in chains. That is not the same “immigration” as say, the “immigrant” British white men who booked passage on ships and sailed voluntarily to the future “USA,” where they built and made themselves rich from the colonial and antebellum slavery-capitalist system.

“We are a country of immigrants” glosses over indigenous genocide, antebellum slavery, settler-colonialism, and systemic racism. Well-meaning people often unmindfully repeat “We are a country of immigrants” to remind themselves why organizations should enact practices to promote diversity and inclusion.

Instead of saying, “We are a country of immigrants,” consider an ANTI-RACISM statement like:

“The United States was built on indigenous genocide, slavery, legalized enforced apartheid, white supremacy, and immigration both forced and voluntary. This is why an ANTI-RACISM Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) focus in the workplace is essential to building a culture of inclusion and belonging.”

You can learn more about becoming an anti-racist leader here, through an e-course I’m co-teaching again with Dr. Keegan Walden of Torch.io: https://utm.io/uItQ

About Dr. A. Breeze Harper

Dr. A. Breeze Harper is a leading expert on diversity, equity, and inclusion having spent 15 years as a speaker and author focusing on anti-racism. Dr. Harper is a guest expert on an anti-racism podcast collaboration with Radical Candor author Kim Scott, and her most recent book, Scars, looks at how anti-racism and white allyship operate in multi-racial relationships. Breeze has a Ph.D. in the social sciences from U.C. Davis, an M.A. from Harvard, and a B.A. from Dartmouth.

AntiRacism Matters and Juneteenth

I wanted to share this with you. Juneteenth is June 19, 2020. I wanted to celebrate the constant struggle and fight for freedom and liberation, and not forget history as well. I’ve been teaching a lot about Black Lives Matters within the context of antiracism-in-action . I prefer antiracism-in-action vs. “ally”. 

Being antiracist is different for white people than it is for people of color. For white people, being antiracist evolves with their racial identity development. They must acknowledge and understand their privilege, work to change their internalized racism, and interrupt racism when they see it. For people of color, it means recognizing how race and racism have been internalized, and whether it has been applied to other people of color. –  National Museum of African American History & Culture


A. Breeze Harper, PhD

About A. Breeze Harper,PhD

Dr. A. Breeze Harper is a senior diversity and inclusion strategist for Critical Diversity Solutionsa seasoned speaker, and author of books and articles related to critical race feminism, intersectional anti-racism, and ethical consumption. As a writer, she is best know for as the creator and editor of the groundbreaking anthology Sistah Vegan: Black Female Vegans Speak on Food, Identity, Health and Society (Lantern Books 2010). 

Dr. Harper is the founder of the Sistah Vegan Project which has put on several ground-breaking conferences with emphasis on intersection of racialized consciousness, anti-racism, and ethical consumption (i.e., veganism, animal rights, Fair Trade). Last year she organized the highly successful conference The Vegan Praxis of Black Lives Matter which can be downloaded.

She is well-known for her talks and workshops about “Uprooting White Fragility in the Ethical Foodscape” and “Intersectional Anti-Racism Activism.”

Harper’s publications can be found here: www.abreezeharper.com

A Mixed Black Kid and a Colonial Farewell Letter for a School Assignment

5th Grade History Book

Adventures of Homeschooling 4 Kids #1:

My 11 year old child just had an assignment to write a farewell letter as if he were living in 1740s Britain and about to move to one of the Thirteen Colonies. I said, “Let’s keep in real. You are a mixed Black child. How do you think this is going to go down?” His assignment was to read about the 13 colonies, their economies, agriculture, topology and then write to his peers about how his new home will be. So, we merged facts of that economy, agriculture, climate with the reality that he would be an enslaved person (1 drop rule, who cares if his papa is White?).

So, he wrote to his peers that he hopes he won’t be separated from his siblings because he learned that that happens on the auction block and that thus far, he has been ‘fortunate’ in Britain as a slave to still be with his family. He wrote to them that he is lucky he can even write a letter because enslaved Africans in the colonies are forbidden to learn how to read and write and he hopes if he survives, he can still write letters to his friends in Britain (and of course, there won’t be many who can even read it if they too are Black like him). He wrote that he isn’t sure he’ll survive that trip across the ocean because he learned that many enslaved Black people are shipped in harmful conditions and many die, while white freed Europeans had a higher chance of surviving the journey because they weren’t shackled and confined with no sanitary options for weeks on end.

The reality is, these assignments can be boring without more deep critical engagement; he was bored at first until I proposed that he write it from his racial-gender embodied perspective. The assignment assumes that the child writing it and showing up in the colonies will be most likely be a white free human. (Note: if this is a white free man , then they would most certainly have ‘awesome’ opportunities as a colonist-capitalist excited for a new adventure to live ‘freely’ away from the King while exploiting and causing suffering for others in the name of his religion– after all, even if white women who were free were to emigrate to the colonies, a patriarchal system would already be in place that also limits her opportunities though she would still be a beneficiary of white privilege. Though Quakers did reside in the 13 colonies and were anti-slavery, the majority of white free human beings there were not.)

So, we shut that sh*t down pretty quickly with this assignment, but in a respectful and anti-racism engaged way. One can write critically for an assignment, do what they are asked and still bring the reality of racial justice and history into it.

If you are getting sanitized readings and assignments of the ‘colonial era’ for your elementary or middle school aged child/children, are you bringing racial-gender inequities into the mix?

In other news…. My fifth grade son has straight hair, broad nose, light skin, light eyes. The other month, a kid at school asked him, “Finish this song…. Fish and chips and vin….” and then my son said, “negar” and except the point is to say, “n*gger”. This is a nonBlack kid telling him this and even though I’m doing antiracism education with the kids, I have not talked about this word yet to any depths, but now I will… However, now that many kids are singing this song to get kids to say ‘n*gger’, me and my husband have had to teach them what this word means, along with his younger sister who has been singing it, aloof. Learn here why kids [of any color ] should not be saying the n-word and here.


I also asked him, since he ‘passes’ as nonBlack for most of his peers and if they knew me, his mother ,was Black (and this assumes they know what ‘nigger’ means), “Do you think they would have asked you to finish the song?”

I shared this just in case you are questioning why anti-racism education is important to integrate into all children’s educational experiences. Songs like these get circulated and clearly, babies are keeping the idea of anti-Blackness and white supremacy alive without even knowing it.

I started a new Social Justice book reading series below for children.

6 Black History Month Challenges for White Folk

Huey from The Boondocks

What would a Black ‘future’ month look like? How would you create a racially equitable system for the future? If it’s hard to conceive of that, ask yourself why. Learn more about why focusing on ‘equity’ is more effective than ‘equality’ rhetoric: https://www.centerforsocialinclusion.org/our-work/what-is-racial-equity/

Consider not using MLK Jr’s “I have a Dream Speech” coupled with mis-using his work as an example of ‘he didn’t care about skin color and we are all equal.‘ Instead, consider learning about EQUITY and MLK Jr’s framing of justice that interrogated capitalism and white supremacy/racism as a SPECTRUM (not some binary) that goes from from ‘liberal’ whites all the way to ‘conservative’ whites. http://www.beacon.org/A-More-Beautiful-and-Terrible-History-P1333.aspx

Map out your own anti-Black racism (conscious or unconscious). Then, actively combat it by being ‘anti-racist’ and not ‘post-racial’. Resource: https://aorta.coop/portfolio_page/dismantling-anti-black-bias-in-democratic-workplaces-a-toolkit/

If you have white children, talk to them about racial inequities and how they benefit from white privilege and anti-Black racism as a 400+ year long ‘system’/history. Try not telling them, “We don’t see color- we are all equal.” One of the most unproductive responses, if your white child comes home and tells you that a Black kid at school was bothered, “Because she was Black,” is to tell them, “That’s not right. Our family doesn’t see color. We are all the same.” Consider framing a productive answer through anti-racism curriculum: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10643-011-0458-95.

If you (as a white person) find the title and/or content of this post ‘racist’, ask yourself why. Believe me, when I point out the patterns of how white racialized consciousness operates in most white people’s heads, I am told I am ‘racist’– despite the research, my 3 degrees focused on black feminist thought and critical theory. I’m not saying it’s ALL white folk, however, there are obvious patterns and ways of thinking that have been shaped by white racist structures. Check out Arnold Farr’s work on racialized consciousness here: http://sistahvegan.com/2009/09/07/racialized-consciousness-and-impact-on-food-philosophies/
Lastly… Learn the difference between ‘race-neutral’ and ‘anti-racist’ behavior/thought patterns. And please stop being a bystander with the excuse that you didn’t want to hurt your mom’s, brother’s, best friend’s, son’s, etc feelings and therefore, didn’t want to challenge their anti-black racist (or any racist) comment, belief, action. Stop saying, “I just try to be neutral”. Overall, you cannot remain neutral on a white supremacist high-speed train in which the driver has fallen asleep. “Oh, I don’t want to hurt their feelings and ‘wake’ them up because I might embarrass them for falling asleep on the job [of being fully loving human being],” is going to get us ALL KILLED. If your physical safety or job security isn’t in jeopardy then speak up and act as an ally. You can refer to my article here http://sistahvegan.com/2017/11/26/the-return-of-the-ngger-breakers-the-white-racist-vegan-playbook/

“One White Man Did Not Single-Handedly ‘Free the Slaves’” (Talking to My Kids About Histories of Racism and Anti-Blackness)

Last Thursday, on the way back from gymnastics and parkour classes, my two eldest children, Eva Luna (8) and Sun (10.5) told me about some of the history they learned in school over the past year. It was another session that was a prime learning moment to engage in a more anti-racist retelling of history. Again, I just have to keep on repeating and re-telling as they are consistently ‘taught’ mis-truths as facts. We have had these conversations before and will continue to have them. Lincoln as the man who “freed the slaves” had been in a conversation we had last year. So, here is how I tried to teach the kids about history and who counts and how it’s narrated. I explained why it is deeply problematic that they are force-fed the narrative, Abraham Lincoln , “Freed the Slaves!”

I hear the former, ad nauseam, from the mouths of K-5 children, who are simply regurgitating what they have been taught, which reinforces the trope of white male saviors. And this myth is contingent upon the other mythic trope that Black and/or indigenous people in the USA have no agency and intelligence to affect massive change during the antebellum period through Jim Crow Era (or even now!)

1. “No one white man (Abe Lincoln) single handedly ‘freed’ enslaved Black people, Sun. It took the work, lots of deaths, and strength of a gazillion Black people, indigenous people, and some white allies.” And I reminded him about Tubman and gave more than a paragraph of information of what she actually did and told them how intelligent and bad ass she was. I explained that unfortunately, K-12 mainstream curriculum does not want to guilt or scare white kids and make white teachers uncomfortable so they tend to explain figures like Harriet Tubman in a more sanitized version . “Do you know how strong, strategic, and intelligent you have to be to free enslaved Black people– as a Black ‘fugitive’ woman, over and over again? Think about that, Sun and Luna. Yea, Lincoln picked up a pen and signed legislation, but Tubman and many like her have been made invisible in your textbooks (And I don’t think most people in the USA understand/know that not all enslaved Black people were ‘freed’ with the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation).”

And Lincoln was a white man embedded in that system of white male privilege. He did have his own investments in keeping that system alive to a large degree (though reforming it), and he was “the white man’s president”, was very ‘progressive’ for his time, but let’s repeat: he was still invested in his own whiteness. More folk should really read more about this erasure from most K-12 history curriculum in the USA.

Lastly, I reminded Sun and Luna to say “enslaved People” vs. “slaves”. “Slaves” did not ‘come over’ from Africa. They were human beings with rich knowledge in math, science, agriculture, art, music… Their knowledge AND labor built the agricultural economy of the USA but that was stolen and benefited landowning white men. “Do you think that is fair? And we talked about the white/black household wealth gap and similar gap for indigenous people. It was 450+ years of this taking of land and labor and our intellectual contributions…” so, i tried to explain systemic inequities and if you had 500+ years to Racially exploit and dehumanize people, the collective results for white people in the USA are privileges from that arrangement. White people collectively are able to have easier access to political power, getting a house, amassing monetary wealth, networking, etc. Collectively, Black and indigenous folk have been hurt by that history and that 450+ year system of bias. And it still happens today, it’s just not necessarily legalized slavery or Jim Crow.

2. “Mom, was George Washington a ‘good’ president because he was honest” (reference to the cherry tree being cut down)?” My response: “Well Sun, it depends. He believed in freedom for landowning white men with enslaved Black people like himself. Please think critically about this and ask yourself why your teachers and history books keep on sanitizing this instead of teaching students that his situation was complex and his privilege as a white landowning man influenced how he thought of ‘freedom for all’. He was living on indigenous land . Stolen land. Genocide. Extreme cruelty towards indigenous and African peoples BENEFITED him and I highly doubt he wasn’t aware of this. He ordered it!”

3. And this led into me talking about Thomas Jefferson and I explained, “Thomas Jefferson did not have a cute romance with Sally Hemings. He owned people and enslaved his own children born out enslaved Black women that he owned and had sex with (they didn’t have a choice and this is called rape). So, ask yourself what type human being do you have to be to think that’s okay? Ask yourself why he is continuously taught as a hero and “progressive” for his time. Maybe he was ‘better’ than other white men, but the question still remains: What kind of human being would do this to their own children?” I explained why their Grandma Pat’s side of the family are both Sales and Jeffersons and that he is a descendant of Jefferson’s immoral and unjust belief system and behaviors.

4. And question 3 led to me telling the kids how Great Grandma Emma came about. Incredibly poor in Jim Crow era of Mississippi, her mother (Great Great Grandma Savannah) needed a new pair of shoes. A White Scottish man told her he’d ‘help’ her if she allowed him to have sex with her. He couldn’t just be kind and give her a pair of shoes. He had to use her the way white slave-owning men used to ‘use’ Black women for sexual, reproductive, etc power which affected how most white men interacted with Black women during the era of Jim Crow. She ended up pregnant and completely depressed about the entire situation. She would just stare into oblivion during much of her pregnancy, too young and too depressed to cope with such a horrific situation to have had to be put into: her reproductive health and agency were compromised, and yes, this is not psychologically or physically healthy... especially when you are pregnant in an area of segregation, you are poor, and you don’t have access to the best Prenatal/maternal care because of gendered-racism embedded in Jim Crow laws.

5. My 5 year old was singing about Columbus Sailing the Ocean Blue. The older two kids noted how and why Columbus Day is “indigenous people’s day”. I said it’s only in certain places (like the SF Bay area where we live) and I asked them to understand larger issues of colonization, creating nations and borders and then I spoke of how California used to be part of Mexico. And of course there is the history of demonizing Mexican people by mainstream white America and racist logic that ended up turning these human beings into ‘subhuman’ . This was the same type of racist system that defined Africans as ‘animals’ or 3/5s human….and then we started talking about legalized racism and xenophobia to the present , and mainstream USA’s “disgust” of Mexican immigrants who are actually on their own land (but, since it was ‘taken’ by the USA, borders and constructions changed and now they are labeled as ‘illegal’ on their own land… and then again, borders are constructs.). I reiterated that white supremacist racism makes it okay to exploit, enslave, etc nonwhite people so the mostly 1% wealthy white folk over the past hundreds of years in the USA can continue to ‘rule’ and convince mainstream America that it’s okay to treat nonwhite people in such a cruel way.

6. Colorism. I asked Luna to be mindful of always being complimented for her ‘pretty eyes’ (Sun too ) because they both have light colored eyes. I said, “How do you think Kira(their younger sister who is 6) feels who is darker and has brown eyes and NEVER gets complimented about HER eyes right after you are complimented and she is standing right next to you ?” I reminded them about colorism again and “You aren’t ‘pretty’ because you have lighter colored eyes and skin. ” Sun asked , “Why is it like that mom?” We talk again about all the images received about who is ‘beautiful’ and the books, movies, ads, teach mainstream USA that fair and lighter skinned people with lighter eyes are the standard of BEAUTY– even when it comes to nonwhite people, lighter skinned Black people are depicted as ‘prettier’. I told them to remember that they benefit from this colorist arrangement even if you aren’t actively colorist– and I benefit as a lighter skinned Black person in comparison to mom(my mother is much darker than me). It’s a spectrum. The closer to ‘whiteness’ the more ‘human’ and ‘prettier’ you are perceived by the mainstream.

7. And then I re-explained race and why it’s different from ethnicity. We went over again how Irish Catholics, for example, are now considered part of the ‘whiteness’ club in the USA when they were not considered ‘fully white’ when my grand father was a child. Granted, Irish Catholics were not racialized as Black and did not have the same unique history of antebellum slavery and Jim Crow, however, me noting this was more of an exercise in thinking about race, why it’s strategized in certain ways, and which demographic ultimately benefits from this whole ‘whiteness club’. Race is ‘made up’ but it has very NEGATIVE and REAL consequences. It doesn’t make sense. The categories change depending on how the 1% can benefit (in terms of capitalism) and how those who are considered white (or close enough) can benefit — because hey, capitalism is contingent upon racialization and racisms to work effectively. (He’s too young for us to get into Black Marxism and racial capitalism, as it relates to Black people…but, one day, though).

8. “Mom, are all white people racist?” Sun asked me this question and asked if his father/my husband is racist since he is white. “No, Sun, it isn’t that simple.” I then explained to Sun and Luna that there are plenty of white people who are either non-racist or anti-racist (both concepts are not the same). That whether white folk like it or not, they will be treated better and get certain privileges (in terms of RACE) just because they are white (similar to colorism and Sun and Luna’s treatment). “Papa doesn’t get pulled over by the police or denied a job, and this is due to assumptions about white men as ‘civilized’, ‘heroes’, and ‘intelligent’ which have been narrated so much that when mainstream society thinks they are thinking without bias, they still are. Papa isn’t racist, but he has benefited from how society is arranged in these racist ways and Papa knows this.”

So yea, this is a long post. I get a lot of parents asking me, “How can I talk to my children about racism?” The above are examples of how I do it. My parents did the same with me (of course they did, they are Black ). Mostly, it is white parents who tell me they don’t know how or when it is appropriate. Don’t keep on holding off. I like www.embracerace.org . Also, the SPLC “teaching tolerance “ series.

About A. Breeze Harper,PhD

Dr. A. Breeze Harper is a senior diversity and inclusion strategist for Critical Diversity Solutionsa seasoned speaker, and author of books and articles related to critical race feminism, intersectional anti-racism, and ethical consumption. As a writer, she is best know for as the creator and editor of the groundbreaking anthology Sistah Vegan: Black Female Vegans Speak on Food, Identity, Health and Society (Lantern Books 2010). Dr. Harper has been invited to deliver many keynote addresses and lectures at universities and conferences throughout North America. In 2015, her lecture circuit focused on the analysis of food and whiteness in her book Scars and on “Gs Up Hoes Down:” Black Masculinity, Veganism, and Ethical Consumption (The Remix)which explored how key Black vegan men use hip-hop methods to create “race-conscious” and decolonizing approaches to vegan philosophies. In 2016, she collaborated with Oakland’s FoodFirst’s Executive Director Dr. Eric Holt-Gimenez to write the backgrounder Dismantling Racism in the Food System, which kicked off FoodFirst’s series on systemic racism within the food system

Dr. Harper is the founder of the Sistah Vegan Project which has put on several ground-breaking conferences with emphasis on intersection of racialized consciousness, anti-racism, and ethical consumption (i.e., veganism, animal rights, Fair Trade). Last year she organized the highly successful conference The Vegan Praxis of Black Lives Matter which can be downloaded.

Dr. Harper’s most recently published book, Scars: A Black Lesbian Experience in Rural White New England (Sense Publishers 2014) interrogates how systems of oppression and power impact the life of the only Black teenager living in an all white and working class rural New England town. Her current 2016 lecture circuit focuses on excerpts from her latest book in progress, Recipes for Racial Tension Headaches: A Critical Race Feminist’s Journey Through ‘Post-Racial’ Ethical Foodscape which will be released in 2017, along with the second Sistah Vegan project anthology The Praxis of Justice in an Era of Black Lives MatterIn tandem with these book projects, she is well-known for her talks and workshops about “Uprooting White Fragility in the Ethical Foodscape” and “Intersectional Anti-Racism Activism.”

Integrative DEI for Written Materials: Make Your Written Words Convey More

Ok, I just slam dunked another client deliverable.

Credit: https://www.vectorstock.com/royalty-free-vector/young-black-woman-basketball-player-with-ball-vector-14187918

I am asked to engage in critical-integrative DEI (Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion) content editing of a manuscript or business materials all the time. I have wonderful clients ranging from bestselling authors on gender equity to top animal rights organizations.

What can I do for you?

You give me written/visual materials and I go over it to make sure you understand how your own embodied experience, privileges, lack their of, etc., shape how you write about the subject at hand and what assumptions you may have had. Beyond “individual” assumptions, I show you how systemic bias and oppressive ideas shape how most people write and think what is ‘universal’. Examples:

1. Many white women often want to write about ‘gender equality’ but collectively, many don’t realize they assume all women are white cisgender straight women. I help them unpack that to create more effective writing and communication.

2. Writing about animal rights and veganism? I will help the writer or organization critically examine how some taken for granted myths (but are believed to be facts) are can create a non-inclusive framing of AR/Veganism. For example, who is excluded when they frame veganism = healthy = skinny? Is this potentially biased rhetoric that may not persuade non-vegans to adopt a plant-based diet? I ask them to unpack that and how biased ideas around being fat, as well as sizeism, etc can impact their ethical writing around veganism and animal rights.

3. Reducing ableist language in a manuscript. For example, “Why are many white people so blind to racial issues?” Consider writing it in a way that excludes the use of ‘blind’ because it can be ableist and implies that blind people are incapable of understanding racial power dynamics simply because they can’t “see”. Try “race- neutral’ or “post-racial” instead. Consider replacing, “We stand for racial justice” to “we are in solidarity with”…. as not everyone can ‘stand’ physically.

Learn more here about my slam dunk services of integrative diversity, equity, and inclusion for your writing project, company materials, etc here at www.criticaldiversitysolutions.com

Dr. A. Breeze Harper is a senior diversity and inclusion strategist for Critical Diversity Solutionsa seasoned speaker, and author of books and articles related to critical race feminism, intersectional anti-racism, and ethical consumption. As a writer, she is best know for as the creator and editor of the groundbreaking anthology Sistah Vegan: Black Female Vegans Speak on Food, Identity, Health and Society (Lantern Books 2010). Dr. Harper has been invited to deliver many keynote addresses and lectures at universities and conferences throughout North America. In 2015, her lecture circuit focused on the analysis of food and whiteness in her book Scars and on “Gs Up Hoes Down:” Black Masculinity, Veganism, and Ethical Consumption (The Remix)which explored how key Black vegan men use hip-hop methods to create “race-conscious” and decolonizing approaches to vegan philosophies. In 2016, she collaborated with Oakland’s FoodFirst’s Executive Director Dr. Eric Holt-Gimenez to write the backgrounder Dismantling Racism in the Food System, which kicked off FoodFirst’s series on systemic racism within the food system

About Dr. A. Breeze Harper

Dr. Harper

Dr. Harper is the founder of the Sistah Vegan Project which has put on several ground-breaking conferences with emphasis on intersection of racialized consciousness, anti-racism, and ethical consumption (i.e., veganism, animal rights, Fair Trade). Last year she organized the highly successful conference The Vegan Praxis of Black Lives Matter which can be downloaded.

Dr. Harper’s most recently published book, Scars: A Black Lesbian Experience in Rural White New England (Sense Publishers 2014) interrogates how systems of oppression and power impact the life of the only Black teenager living in an all white and working class rural New England town. Her current 2016 lecture circuit focuses on excerpts from her latest book in progress, Recipes for Racial Tension Headaches: A Critical Race Feminist’s Journey Through ‘Post-Racial’ Ethical Foodscape which will be released in 2017, along with the second Sistah Vegan project anthology The Praxis of Justice in an Era of Black Lives MatterIn tandem with these book projects, she is well-known for her talks and workshops about “Uprooting White Fragility in the Ethical Foodscape” and “Intersectional Anti-Racism Activism.”